Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Commer trucks

Commercial Cars was formed in 1905 and during the First World War they produced over 3,000 4 ton trucks. After the war the company changed it's name to Commer Cars. Around the same time, the Company got into difficulties and in 1926 they were taken over by Humber. The Rootes Group then took over Humber in 1928 as well as Karrier Motors. After the Second World War the Rootes Group also acquired Vulcan Motor Company and Tilling-Stevens. The Rootes Group was taken over by Chrysler in 1973 (although they had first bought into the company in 1964). The Commer name was not used after 1976. 

Here's a selection of Commers taken at various locations over the past few years.


Commer Superpoise. The Superpoise range was first produced in 1955. 
Golden Oldies Tuck Show at Dubbo in 2012


Superpoise at Hunter Valley truck muster in 2011


Another Superpoise at the Sydney Classic and Antique Truck show in 2012.


A retired Superpoise seen at Avoca in 2009


Graeme Johnston's 1960 Commer Knocker at Longwarry Truck show in 2014


Steve Camilleri's Knocker at the Echuca Truck show in 2013


Peter Maude's Commer displayed at the Ballarat Branch of the HCVC truck show at Clunes in 2012


John Gramlick's 1961 Commer Knocker and 1954 strap trailer at Longwarry Truck Show in 2014 and a close up of the truck below at Trucks in Action, Lardner Park Warragul in 2012



This Commer was at the Ballarat Branch of the HCVC truck show at Clunes in 2012


 Bruce Gunter's Commer at the Hunter Valley Truck Muster in 2011 and another view of it, below, at the Sudney Classic and Antique Truck Show in 2012




A restorer's delight displayed at the Ballarat Branch of the HCVC truck show at Clunes in 2012



Another  restorer's delight displayed at the Ballarat Branch of the HCVC truck show at Clunes, this time in 2014


Lancefield Truck Show 2014 and shown below so you can see the tray, at the Echuca Truck show in 2013.




A neat Commer at the  Ballarat Branch of the HCVC truck show at Clunes in 2012



HCVC Display day at Sandown in 2008


Sale Vintage Tractor Club rally at Longford in 2009.


A trio of Commers at the HCVC Display day at Sandown in 2011.


John Gramlick's 1970 Commer van at Longwarry Truck Show in 2014.


Warren Harris' Karrier at the Ballarat Branch of the HCVC truck show at Clunes in 2014

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Sydney Classic and Antique Truck Show 2014 - American trucks

John and I drove up to Penrith to take a look at this show held at the Museum of Fire at Penrith on Sunday June 15 2014. There was around 150 vehicles on display - this post shows most of the American trucks. To see British, European and Japanese trucks, plus some historic fire trucks and police cars - click here.


Only Osh Kosh on display


There were two Seattle cab Kenworths on display - John was on seventh heaven seeing them  - the one in original condition, above, and the very snazzy red one, below.



John Knight's SAR


Red Kenworth


Blue Kenworths



Green Kenworths




W-model Kenworth


Chevrolet


Blitz - Chev or Ford?


More Chevs



 


Chev tow truck


Diamond T


What's this? A Diamond T or a Mack?


A delightful display of Dodges










A Fargo


 A fabulous flock of Fords








The Arnott's Ford and Albion







The final Ford


An interesting collection of Inters








 
Inter T-line 2670

Many Macks made their way to the show. The one, above, was very nice  a 1942 model.












 


This is a Republic. The Republic Motor Truck Company began manufacturing trucks in 1913 in Alma, Michigan as the Alma Motor Truck Company. They changed the name in 1914. They were the largest manufacturer of trucks in America in 1918-1919 and produced over 10,000 trucks. In 1928 they were acquired by the Linn Manufacturing Corporation and merged with American-La France in 1929 and became La-France-Republic Corporation. They cold trucks under the Republic name in England until 1931. (Source: The Complete Encyclopedia of Commercial Vehicles)


Here are the Whites









This post shows most of the American trucks. To see British, European and Japanese trucks, plus some historic fire engines and police cars - click here